Ray Kane October 1925 – February 2008

March 1, 2008
Ray Kane

Genoa Keawe October 1918 – February 2008

March 1, 2008
Genoa Keawe

Life in These Islands

January 18, 2008
Kaukahi

Hawaiinawa

January 1, 2008
Hawaiinawa

Hawaiinawa is a exciting new CD release from beloved Hawaiian musician Teresa Bright. This new concept CD was inspired by the Japanese love for the Hawaiian culture, music and hula. Hawiinawa also draws in the recent popularity of Okinawan music among Japan’s younger generation. Hawaiinawa brings these two cultures together and entwines Okinawan music with the sweet gentle language and sounds of Hawai’i. Hawaii and Okinawa have so many similiarities. They are island that were once independent kingdoms, rule by ancient chiefs who were overthrown by other nations. Okinawa and Hawaii also share two seasons, winter and summer and the same temperatures through the year. This is a unique and captivating collection of music and the cultures that is recorded in the Hawaiian language and arranged with the the Kiho’alu (slack key) tunings. It is all all flavored with the vocal style of Teresa Bright.

Dancing Hula

December 1, 2007

Nani Hula

Celebrating Maile Culture

November 1, 2007

Moana Music was established in 2006 as an ongoing project celebrating Maile Culture and the music of the Pacific and Hawaiian Islands. Moana Music is about Celebrating Hawaiian Spirit. Moana Music receives very generous support from Silk Road Arts Foundation.

Dancing Hula

August 1, 2007

Dancing Hula

Hula dancing is the essence and spirit of Hawaii. Initially it was treated as a sacred ritual, but it slowly it has became a form of social entertainment. The dance is not without meaning. In fact, the heart of hula dancing is poetic text, which is referred to as Mele. All movements are interpreted and performed on the basis of the text. In hula dancing, hand and arm gestures are combined with rhythmic twisting and swirling. Each movement has a particular meaning and this coupled with the expressive hand gestures have even greater significance. While dancing, the movements that the dancers make may represent any facet of nature or life. Plants, trees, war, wind fire and water. All the elements are adequately represented and the viewer has no doubt in his mind as to the meanings are with each movement. This is because hula dancing by its movements embodies the essence of thing it represents. The dancers incorporate to exactitude the elements of life and nature and the chanting aids in narrating the story.

Initially in hula dancing, the emphasis was on the words only, but as many people do not understand tho early chants, this form of dancing has become more expressive and understandable. Interestingly enough, there are many types of hula dancing and these are performed at different times and in different ways. Hula hue was a kind of endurance dance used at the end of a program while hula hapa haole was a westernized version with English words. Hula hula pertained to a type of dancing where there were many people involved. Some sang and some played the drum.

Hula o Kalâkaua was dancing reserved for the King’s coronation. Hula kuhi Lima was a sitting hula where the dancer swayed the body in keeping with the music and made eloquent hand gestures. The modern day hula auana is very informal and there is no ceremony involved. It is danced to the accompaniment of instrument like the guitars and is very popular on the islands of Hawaii.

Whatever be the form of hula dancing, the essence and spirit of the dance is always felt. It has a strange impact on the viewers and often makes one want to join in. Hula dancing in spite of metamorphosis is here to stay. Its magnetic charm touches all who see. The origins of hula are open to interpretation. Some believe it came from the ancient civilization of Mu, some claim it was indigenous, while others say that it had its roots in Tahiti . Whatever be its origin or its roots, there is no doubt that the Hula is the link which binds the dancers with the universe and symbolizes their unity with all creation.

Moana Hula

The Music of Maunalua

August 1, 2007

Maunalua

Maunalua is Bobby Moderow, Jr., who was schooled by the legendary Raymond Kane, playing rhythm and slack key guitar, as well as providing vocals; Kahi Kaonohi, a journeyman musician with many local groups and Halau before settling in with Maunalua, playing bass guitar and singing; and Bruce Spencer, whose strong foundation in local music harmonies rounds out the group with his six-string ukulele and vocals

Loke Lane Hula Band

July 25, 2007

Loke Lane Hula

The Ohana Loke Lane Hula Band continues to take a low key approach to their music just like the original Loke Lane Trio. “We’re not a working hula band and we don’t aspire to be full time singers either. We don’t even want to be famous” says Leanne.  The Ohana Loke Lane Hula Band features Mark on guitar, Leanne on Ukelele and vocals, Andrea on Lead Vocals and Ukelele and Eric on Background Vocals and Rhythm Guitar. “We perform hula and sing just because we love the music” says Andrea. The whole thing started at the Halakahiki Paniolo Pineapple Party & Luau in 2004. We just continued on since then. Ohana Loke Lane Hual Band has always kept a low key profile and true to the roots of Hawaiian Hula ever since their first appearance. Ohana Loke Lane Hula Band has only played with a few other Hula Bands before. Ohana Loke Lane Hula Band likes to sing and they still like to dance Hula wherever they go.

Dancing Hula on Moana Terrace

July 1, 2007

Moana Hula

Hula dancing is the essence and spirit of Hawaii. Initially it was treated as a sacred ritual, but it slowly it has became a form of social entertainment. The dance is not without meaning. In fact, the heart of hula dancing is poetic text, which is referred to as Mele. All movements are interpreted and performed on the basis of the text. In hula dancing, hand and arm gestures are combined with rhythmic twisting and swirling. Each movement has a particular meaning and this coupled with the expressive hand gestures have even greater significance. While dancing, the movements that the dancers make may represent any facet of nature or life. Plants, trees, war, wind fire and water. All the elements are adequately represented and the viewer has no doubt in his mind as to the meanings are with each movement. This is because hula dancing by its movements embodies the essence of thing it represents. The dancers incorporate to exactitude the elements of life and nature and the chanting aids in narrating the story.

Moana Hula